Monday, May 25, 2020

Research Proposal Nazareth College - 1243 Words

There is no question that our resources on earth such as water, electricity and plastic are limited. As humans, we have begun to realize that we cannot consume these resources at a high rate because if we do our future generations will be left with nothing. A large part of cutting down on resource consumption is practicing sustainability on college campuses. Colleges and Universities around the country are currently attempting to become more â€Å"green† or environmentally sustainable. Nazareth College has already begun to take steps towards sustainability with new L.E.D lights and recycling bins around campus, but the college can definitely take more strides towards becoming a more green campus. Nazareth College could improve on becoming a more sustainable campus by creating an atmosphere where students are more involved, limiting resource use in dorms, academic buildings and the dining hall, and by giving students and faculty more incentive to act in ways that are envir onment friendly. Nazareth College must receive interest of sustainability from students to truly succeed in becoming a greener school. Students play a vital role in fulfilling the potential a campus has to becoming environmentally sustainable because they are the main users of the resources on the college. Water usage is extremely high in dorms due to sinks, toilets and especially showers. Peter Lana, the facilities director at Nazareth College, stated that the most water usage on the entire campus inShow MoreRelatedPedagogical Journal Essay1038 Words   |  5 Pagesteaching approach meets the needs of learners in specific ways, and the strengths and challenges of the approach. The proposal is now under review at two leading academic publishers. Another medium-term project is creating a global network of academics partnering closely with practitioners, managers, and refugees focused on all resettlement issues. For my higher education-focused research, a medium-term project involves securing global partners to pilot the service-learning/community-based teaching student

Thursday, May 14, 2020

Essay on Civil Rights Activists Malcolm X - 1061 Words

Malcolm X was a muslim, black man who cared very much about gaining equal rights. He was, in a way, an extremist. Though only taking action when he felt necessary, when he did take action, it often had drastic effects on the people and events occurring around him. Unlike Martin Luther King or other leading civil rights activists, he did not believe in peaceful protest. He believed in â€Å"whatever means necessary† to accomplish his goals. Because of his strong efforts and his unmatched determination, Malcolm X, formally known as Malcolm Little, changed the course of the civil rights movement. If not for him, the events that played out to cause the eventual conclusion of the struggle would have been forever altered. Mr. Little’s journey†¦show more content†¦Click Slide. Because of this, more and more people started to hear and know about Malcolm X, therefore causing a burst in fame. Many people disagreed with Malcolm X, and in public would talk down to him. Iro nically, this outrage from the world and the U.S. further popularized the beliefs and intentions of Mr. Little. Malcolm X’s extreme views and takes on the solutions to racism were seen increasingly in the civil rights movement. If not for his assassination, he would have become a major competitor to Martin King’s way of protest. Although many negative actions were performed because of him, his influence was not all negative. He made the whites take him and his supporters seriously. If not for him, it is possible that King would not have been taken seriously either. He condemned the march on Washington - calling it, in his own autobiography, â€Å"the farce on Washington.† Because of Malcolm, hundreds, if not thousands of blacks did not march that day. Even though today many consider that a bad thing, he thought that the march demeaned and unempowered people of African-American descent. Malcolm X brought pride to being black. He did not think that blacks had to be given rights by whites, but that they were independent peoples. Although before he could accomplish his life wishes he was assassinated, his impact on the Civil Rights Movement will never be forgotten. Historians will never forget the man whoShow MoreRelatedThe Civil Rights Activist Malcolm X1631 Words   |  7 Pagesâ€Å"The future belongs to those who prepare for it today† said Malcolm X (â€Å"1960’s). To fully understand what Malcolm X was trying to say, one would have to understand what â€Å"future† really means. Future: the time or a period of time following the moment of speaking or writing; time regarded as still to come (Merriam). An interpretation of this is that one should prepare for the future, so that when the future becomes the present, a person knows she or he did everything thing he could have to make todayRead MoreCivil Rights Activist, Malcolm X1028 Words   |  4 PagesMalcolm X We didnt land on Plymouth Rock, Plymouth Rock landed on us.(Malcolm X).Even though Elijah Muhammad was bad to all these women and had gotten them pregnant. Malcolm X still believed in the thought of Muslims ways and Elijah’s teachings , especially when everything was segregated between whites and blacks adding on, Malcolm X had a bad past with white people. Malcolm X’s trip to Mecca had made him perceive something new. There in Mecca everyone was equal, the white man there wereRead MoreMalcolm X, A Civil Right Activist And Powerful Black Leader855 Words   |  4 PagesIn the influential and provoking essay â€Å"Learning to Read† (1965), Malcolm X, a civil right activist and powerful black leader, narrates his story on how books transformed his life forever into the realm of human rights. Incorporating sequential narrative and social analysis, he explains his methodology in attaining literacy and how this process influences him to espouse black separatism and resent white people, while providing historical fact and jarring criticism in his arguments. Using first-personRead MoreThe Death Before Disunity : Malcolm X, Civil Rights Activist And Muslim Leader1173 Words   |  5 PagesDeath before Disunity Malcolm X, Civil Rights activist and Muslim leader, was an advocate of unity by all means necessary. Throughout history, people have often pondered what X intended to obtain before his tragic death at the hands of Talmadge Hayer, Norman 3X Butler, and Thomas 15X Johnson (â€Å"Biography†). Several people downplay X’s achievements in comparison to the accomplishments of Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr. Majority of activists such as Mohandas Gandhi, Rosa Parks, and Cesar Chavez are notoriousRead MoreAfrican Americans And The Civil Rights Activists Like Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. And Malcolm X Essay951 Words   |  4 Pagesis Black images which speak to and inspire Black people† stated in â€Å"Documents from the Black Arts Movement† (Karenga). This statement speaks truth to how African Americans felt in the 1960s and still today. Many great Civil Rights activists like Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. and Malcolm X wanted to set examples including being the voice of Afr ican Americans because many were silent about the injustice they endured from white Americans. Blacks felt that having artists of their own kind to relate to wouldRead More Some Lead, Some Follow, Others Change the World1114 Words   |  5 PagesWhen being asked which Civil Rights activist of the movement was most effective, the answer is quite obvious. This movement originated due to what is called â€Å"Jim Crow† laws. These laws suggested that everyone is separate but equal. Otherwise became blindingly apparent when African Americans were subdued by whites in various ways. For example, the justice system always considered the case of white man over a black one. Also, an African American facility was certainly not comparable to the superiorRead MoreThe Significance of the Role of Malcolm X on African American Activists1634 Words   |  7 PagesTo what extent was the role of Malcolm X significant in the rise of radical African American activism (1965-1968)? A. Plan of the Investigation To what extent was the role of Malcolm X significant in the rise of radical African American activism (1965-1968)? This investigation will assess the significance of Malcolm X’s significance in giving rise to African American activism. Malcolm X’s motives, involvement in the civil rights movement and his leadership will all be discussed in order toRead MoreMalcolm X and the Civil Rights Movement Essay730 Words   |  3 PagesThe Civil Rights Movement includes social movements in the United States whose objective was to end racial segregation as well as discrimination against African-Americans. Civil rights are a class of rights that protects individuals freedom and ensure ones ability to participate in the civil and political life. Civil rights include the ensuring of life and safety, protection from an individual. The United States tries to get voting rights for them. The phase of the movement began in 1954 and endedRead MoreWhy Black Activists Rejected Martin Luther King and Follwed Malcolm X730 Words   |  3 Pagesmain black activist leaders of the early 1950s were Martin Luth er King and Malcolm X. Today, both of these men would be remembered as great leaders.However, these two men had totally different approaches towards meeting the same main goal. Both Martin Luther King and Malcolm X fought for civil rights; however Malcolm X also wanted to have a separate black society whereas Martin Luther wanted the integration of white people with black people. Malcolm X believed thatRead MoreAfrican Americans And The Civil Rights Movement1624 Words   |  7 PagesDuring the early 1950’s and 1960’s, the civil rights movement defined how African Americans progressed from being considered second class citizens to a unified demographic who became more endowed to handle the high tensions between them and the white segregationists. After World War II, protests began to rise between the 1950’s and 1960’s. The large number of blacks that served in the military or worked in the war industry saw that they had a greater place in the world than they had been given in

Wednesday, May 6, 2020

Paradise Lost Essay - 1073 Words

Peter Schrag presents the ills of California?fs current politics in an angry and persuasive tone. He says California used to be ?gboth model and magnet for the nation—in its economic opportunities, its social outlook, and its high-quality public services and institutes?h; however, California started to fade after the passage of Proposition 13, the initiative of tax limits (7). Schrag?fs work clearly shows what is the problem in today?fs California, and it is easy to understand even for those who have little knowledge of politics. By focusing on issues of ?gneopopulism?h which is easy to find in California?fs diversity, he succeeds in giving his readers the sense of crisis not only about California?fs politics, but also the national wide†¦show more content†¦In the second section, ?gGood-bye El Dorado,?h Schrag focuses on the issues of public services which he calls ?gMississippification,?h infrastructure, ?gthe fundamentally changed government structure,?h and ?gsocia l relations that California?fs tax revolt and its political progeny have produced,?h especially he pays particularly close attention to ?gMississippification?h of the public school system. The budge for the educational system use to be mostly financed by property taxation; however, the state government stopped to spend enough money to keep the high quality educational system after Proposition 13 passed. He describes today?fs California schools as ?gmigrant camp—row after row of drab wooden boxes of uncertain safety, most of them painted brown?h (83). It helps imagine easily California?fs schools with high densities of children and poor conditions. Older and affluent whites, Schrag tells us, care primarily about tax reduction, and they had disproportionate power because the majority of voters were whites. Many measures which reduced tax from rich people and increased from poor people, ?gwho use public services but vote in much lower numbers,?h passed, with the result that the gap between upper-middle class and low income class extended. Schrag shows important facts related to that class issue and howShow MoreRelatedParadise Lost788 Words   |  4 PagesParadise Lost Paradise Lost is a poem about Adam and Eve, how they were created and how they came to lose their place in the Garden of Eden, which was also called Paradise. It is very similar to the book of Genesis in the Bible, except it is expanded by John Milton into a very long, detailed, narrative poem with a different view of Satan. Even though he leads a war against God, is sent to hell, and seeks revenge throughout the poem h still ends up being a very likable character. In â€Å"ParadiseRead MoreThe Paradise Lost By Milton1380 Words   |  6 PagesMilton reproduces the scenes of Bible in his Paradise Lost. This epic reveals the sin and degradation of human beings in twelve volumes. In the beginning, because of Satan’s challenging of authority, he has been expelled from the realm of heaven to the hell by God. This rebelling hero always seeks for a chance to take his revenge on the unshakable authority. Based on consideration of the strength of his party, man, the newest creation of God, turned into the ideal target. In the end, Eve successfullyRead More Paradise Lost Essay2124 Words   |  9 PagesParadise Lost The poem is divided up into 12 books. The verse is English heroic without rhyme, as that of Homer in Greek, and of Virgil in Latin. (Knopf, 1996) â€Å"This neglect then of rhyme so little is to be taken for a defect, though it may seem so perhaps to vulgar readers, that it rather is to be esteemed an example set, the first in English, of ancient liberty recovered to heroic poem from the troublesome and modern bondage of writing.† (Knopf, 1996) Book One proposesRead MoreHeroic in Paradise Lost by John Lost Essay1637 Words   |  7 PagesThe theme of the heroic in John Miltons Paradise Lost is one that has often been the focus of critical debate, namely in the debate surrounding which character is the true hero of the poem. Most critics of the subject have, however, noted that the difficultly in defining the hero of Miltons work is mainly due to our â€Å"vague understanding of what constitutes heroism†1 and the fact that â€Å"the term itself is equivocal†2. The vague terming of what heroism can be defined as it what draws criticsRead MoreParadise Lost By John Milton853 Words   |  4 PagesAt first glance, Paradise Lost by John Milton can easily give the impression that this classic piece of literature is a cut copy of the Book of Genesis. Contrary to that notion, Milton’s retelling of the story of the fall of man differs from the western idealized Old Testament in many ways. Throughout the 10,000 lines of the poem, Milton characterizes Adam, Eve, and Satan [Lucifer] with vivid, well thought out dialogue. Overall, Milton’s reimplementation of the archetypal text of the Book of GenesisRead MoreThe Role of Satan in Paradise Lost1455 Words   |  6 PagesThe Role of Satan in â€Å"Paradise Lost† John Miltons epic â€Å"Paradise Lost† is one that has brought about much debate since its writing. This epic tells the Biblical story of Adam and Eve, although from a different perspective than what most people usually see. Milton tells the story more through the eyes of Satan, whom most people usually consider the ultimate villain. The way in which Satan is portrayed in this story has caused speculation as to whether Satan is actually a hero in this situationRead MoreParadise Lost By John Milton1266 Words   |  6 Pages John Milton was said to be a devout Christian who took a broad and bold stance in many of his works in depicting the Bible in one way or the other. Some of these works are Samson Agonistes, Paradise Regained, On the Morning of Christ’s Nativity, and most famously known, Paradise Lost. Paradise Lost tells of the fall of mankind through Adam and Eve, very similar to the story that is in the Bible. This epic poem embodies many different stories and i magery taken from the Bible several times. John MiltonRead MoreParadise Lost By John Milton Essay1387 Words   |  6 PagesEve in Paradise Lost In the visions of Western world and civilization, the descend of mankind from the Garden of Eden serves as the prominent, underlying story of the formulation of existence. In 1667, in the seventeenth century, author John Milton recasts the creation story in an epic form of poetry consisting of ten books with over ten thousand lines of verse, in order to conspicuously portray the characters and their actions that lead to the Fall of Mankind. In both Paradise Lost and the BibleRead MoreAdam Eve Lost in Paradise782 Words   |  4 PagesParadise Lost by John Milton: Discuss the relationship between Adam and Eve, as portrayed in Book 9 of Paradise Lost. How does Milton’s portrayal compare to or differ from how Adam and Eve are typically portrayed, described, or understood? Thoughts of Eve conjure images of a meek woman who is submissive and created to serve her husband. Adam is thought of as a strong, beautiful man created in the likeness of God. He is the ruler of land and sea and leader of all mankind. Their relationship isRead MoreParadise Lost By John Milton875 Words   |  4 PagesIn Paradise Lost there are many characters that are portrayed as a hero. What qualities can someone show to classify them as hero? A hero is someone who persist against all odds, someone who is willing to plunge into depth of his inner being. Satan is one particular character people question as being a hero in Paradise Lost. In Paradise Lost, Milton explains the biblical story of Adam and Eve. Although in the book he shows Satan as being unheroic, but he still display hero qualities. Satan is ultimately

Tuesday, May 5, 2020

Frankenstein Essay Thesis Example For Students

Frankenstein Essay Thesis Although humans have the tendency to set idealistic goals to better future generations, often the results can prove disastrous, even deadly. The tale of Frankenstein, by Mary Shelley, focuses on the outcome of one mans idealistic motives and desires of dabbling with nature, which result in the creation of horrific creature. Victor Frankenstein was not doomed to failure from his initial desire to overstep the natural bounds of human knowledge. Rather, it was his poor parenting of his progeny that lead to his creations thirst for the vindication of his unjust life. In his idealism, Victor is blinded, and so the creation accuses him for delivering him into a world where he could not ever be entirely received by the people who inhabit it. Not only failing to foresee his faulty idealism, nearing the end of the tale, he embarks upon a final journey, consciously choosing to pursue his creation in vengeance, while admitting he himself that it may result in his own doom. The creation of an un loved being and the quest for the elixir of life holds Victor Frankenstein more accountable for his own death than the creation himself. Delivered into the world, full grown and without a guardian to teach him the ways of the human world, the creation discovers that he is alone, but not without resource. He attempts to communicate to his creator, however, he is incapable of speech. As Frankenstein recounts the situation, he says,I beheld the wretchthe miserable monster whom I had created. He held up the curtain of the bed; and his eyes, if eyes they may be called, were fixed on me. His jaw opened, and he muttered some inarticulate sounds, while a grin wrinkled his cheeks. He might have spoken, but I did not hear; one hand was stretched out, seemingly to detain me, but I escaped and rushed downstairs (Shelley, p. 43). As Frankenstein explains, he declares that he deliberately neglects to communicate with his creation, based on its shockingly hideous appearance. Had Frankenstein taken the time to communicate and care for his creation, with all the knowledge that he possesses of the responsibility of a good parent, the creation would have never developed the sense of vindication and reprisal that lead him to murdering Victors loved ones. The creation would henceforth account Frankenstein for all his sufferings succeeding his birth. Frankensteins first of numerous mistaken decisions ill-fating his destiny relies greatly upon a lack of responsibility for the creation he so passionately brings to life in the early chapters of his tale. From his very first words, Victor claims to have been born to two indefatigably affectionate parents in an environment of abundant knowledge. As he speaks of his parents, Frankenstein attempts to portray his fortunate upbringing, Much as they were attached to each other, they seemed to draw inexhaustible stores of affection from a very mine of love to bestow them upon me. My mothers tender caresses and my fathers smile of benevolent pleasure while regarding me are my first recollections. I was their plaything and their idol, and something bettertheir child, the innocent and helpless creature bestowed on them by heaven, whom to bring up to good, and whose future lot it was in their hands to direct to happiness or misery, according as they fulfilled their duties towards me (Shelley, p. 19). By these recollections, Frankenstein illustrates his parents as being the most ideal caregivers imaginable to any child, being granted the all the vital tools of a responsible guardian as a result, which he neglects to utilize upon animating his creation. Frankenstein abandons his hideous child, feelings of vindication arise, and the creation kills members of his family for all the mental anguish that has been set upon him. .u8b1f3c5a183d61b5a65bc0ccb43aa1c8 , .u8b1f3c5a183d61b5a65bc0ccb43aa1c8 .postImageUrl , .u8b1f3c5a183d61b5a65bc0ccb43aa1c8 .centered-text-area { min-height: 80px; position: relative; } .u8b1f3c5a183d61b5a65bc0ccb43aa1c8 , .u8b1f3c5a183d61b5a65bc0ccb43aa1c8:hover , .u8b1f3c5a183d61b5a65bc0ccb43aa1c8:visited , .u8b1f3c5a183d61b5a65bc0ccb43aa1c8:active { border:0!important; } .u8b1f3c5a183d61b5a65bc0ccb43aa1c8 .clearfix:after { content: ""; display: table; clear: both; } .u8b1f3c5a183d61b5a65bc0ccb43aa1c8 { display: block; transition: background-color 250ms; webkit-transition: background-color 250ms; width: 100%; opacity: 1; transition: opacity 250ms; webkit-transition: opacity 250ms; background-color: #95A5A6; } .u8b1f3c5a183d61b5a65bc0ccb43aa1c8:active , .u8b1f3c5a183d61b5a65bc0ccb43aa1c8:hover { opacity: 1; transition: opacity 250ms; webkit-transition: opacity 250ms; background-color: #2C3E50; } .u8b1f3c5a183d61b5a65bc0ccb43aa1c8 .centered-text-area { width: 100%; position: relative ; } .u8b1f3c5a183d61b5a65bc0ccb43aa1c8 .ctaText { border-bottom: 0 solid #fff; color: #2980B9; font-size: 16px; font-weight: bold; margin: 0; padding: 0; text-decoration: underline; } .u8b1f3c5a183d61b5a65bc0ccb43aa1c8 .postTitle { color: #FFFFFF; font-size: 16px; font-weight: 600; margin: 0; padding: 0; width: 100%; } .u8b1f3c5a183d61b5a65bc0ccb43aa1c8 .ctaButton { background-color: #7F8C8D!important; color: #2980B9; border: none; border-radius: 3px; box-shadow: none; font-size: 14px; font-weight: bold; line-height: 26px; moz-border-radius: 3px; text-align: center; text-decoration: none; text-shadow: none; width: 80px; min-height: 80px; background: url(https://artscolumbia.org/wp-content/plugins/intelly-related-posts/assets/images/simple-arrow.png)no-repeat; position: absolute; right: 0; top: 0; } .u8b1f3c5a183d61b5a65bc0ccb43aa1c8:hover .ctaButton { background-color: #34495E!important; } .u8b1f3c5a183d61b5a65bc0ccb43aa1c8 .centered-text { display: table; height: 80px; padding-left : 18px; top: 0; } .u8b1f3c5a183d61b5a65bc0ccb43aa1c8 .u8b1f3c5a183d61b5a65bc0ccb43aa1c8-content { display: table-cell; margin: 0; padding: 0; padding-right: 108px; position: relative; vertical-align: middle; width: 100%; } .u8b1f3c5a183d61b5a65bc0ccb43aa1c8:after { content: ""; display: block; clear: both; } READ: Banking Concept Of Education EssayIn his idealism, Frankenstein is blinded and fails or is unable to foresee the dangerous outcome of his creation, giving life to a hideous being that could never be accepted in such a superficial world. As Frankenstein recounts the procedures of making his being, he admits himself that his idealism blinded his ability to foresee the drastic effects that might result in giving life to an unloved creature. No one can conceive the variety of feelings which bore me onward like a hurricane, in the first enthusiasm of success. Life and death appeared to me ideal bounds, which I should break through, and pour a torrent of light into our dark world. A new species would bless me as its creator and source; many happy and excellent natures would owe their being to me. No father could claim the gratitude of his child so completely as I should deserve theirs. Pursuing these reflections, I thought that if I could bestow animation upon lifeless matter, I might in process of time (although I now found it impossible) renew life where death had apparently devoted the body to corruption (Shelley, p. 38-39). Frankensteins intent was to create a being unlike any other, superior to all human life and so he picked the most perfect body parts and beauteous features, all to be pieced together in great anticipation. However, the results are horrific and irreversible. Accusing Frankenstein of bringing him into a world where he could never be accepted, the creation realizes his creators faulty idealism. However, Frankenstein is unable to detect his idealistic blindness. In a conversation with Frankenstein, the creation explains, attempting to make him conceive the amount of mental anguish that has been brought upon him by giving him life,instead of threatening, I am content to reason with you. I am malicious because I am miserable. Am I not shunned and hated by all mankind? You, my creator, would tear me to pieces and triumph; remember that, and tell me why I should pity man more than he pities me? You would not call it murder if you could precipitate me into one of those ice-rifts and destroy m y frame, the work of you own hands (Shelley, p.130). In the creations loathsome words, he merely justifies that had Frankenstein not have been passionately immersed in the creation of a superior being, gigantic and repulsive as a result, all his sufferings would cease to exist. Longing for the attention that Frankenstein neglects to provide him with at his birth, the creation attempts to gain it by stalking and killing his loved ones. The creation does finally attain this attention as Frankenstein feels that he no longer has any reason to live but to seek revenge upon the being that has ultimately destroyed him. Upon hearing Frankensteins declarations of reprisal, the creation is delighted in finally receiving the attention that he neglected to provide to him at his birth. The creation challenges him in pursuing him and. replies, I am satisfied miserable wretch! You have determined to live, and I am satisfied, (Shelley, 186). Frankenstein initiates the conflict that would lead directly to his doom. Consciously choosing to pursue his creation, Frankenstein implores himself to seek reprisal upon him. Frankenstein vows that he will undertake the great task that is the pursuit of his creation. Although he may be enraged with vengeance and unrestrained anger, Fr ankenstein does admit that this pursuit may indeed result in his own death. As he declares this vengeance, he says,By the sacred earth on which I kneel, by the shades that wander near me, by thee, O Night, and the spirits that preside over thee, to pursue the demon who caused this misery, until he or I shall perish in mortal conflict. For this purpose I will preserve my life; to execute this dear revenge will I again behold the sun and tread the green herbage of earth, which otherwise should vanish from my eyes forever (Shelley, p. 186). .u2b67f0da6207e7ceced9a967f94de5dc , .u2b67f0da6207e7ceced9a967f94de5dc .postImageUrl , .u2b67f0da6207e7ceced9a967f94de5dc .centered-text-area { min-height: 80px; position: relative; } .u2b67f0da6207e7ceced9a967f94de5dc , .u2b67f0da6207e7ceced9a967f94de5dc:hover , .u2b67f0da6207e7ceced9a967f94de5dc:visited , .u2b67f0da6207e7ceced9a967f94de5dc:active { border:0!important; } .u2b67f0da6207e7ceced9a967f94de5dc .clearfix:after { content: ""; display: table; clear: both; } .u2b67f0da6207e7ceced9a967f94de5dc { display: block; transition: background-color 250ms; webkit-transition: background-color 250ms; width: 100%; opacity: 1; transition: opacity 250ms; webkit-transition: opacity 250ms; background-color: #95A5A6; } .u2b67f0da6207e7ceced9a967f94de5dc:active , .u2b67f0da6207e7ceced9a967f94de5dc:hover { opacity: 1; transition: opacity 250ms; webkit-transition: opacity 250ms; background-color: #2C3E50; } .u2b67f0da6207e7ceced9a967f94de5dc .centered-text-area { width: 100%; position: relative ; } .u2b67f0da6207e7ceced9a967f94de5dc .ctaText { border-bottom: 0 solid #fff; color: #2980B9; font-size: 16px; font-weight: bold; margin: 0; padding: 0; text-decoration: underline; } .u2b67f0da6207e7ceced9a967f94de5dc .postTitle { color: #FFFFFF; font-size: 16px; font-weight: 600; margin: 0; padding: 0; width: 100%; } .u2b67f0da6207e7ceced9a967f94de5dc .ctaButton { background-color: #7F8C8D!important; color: #2980B9; border: none; border-radius: 3px; box-shadow: none; font-size: 14px; font-weight: bold; line-height: 26px; moz-border-radius: 3px; text-align: center; text-decoration: none; text-shadow: none; width: 80px; min-height: 80px; background: url(https://artscolumbia.org/wp-content/plugins/intelly-related-posts/assets/images/simple-arrow.png)no-repeat; position: absolute; right: 0; top: 0; } .u2b67f0da6207e7ceced9a967f94de5dc:hover .ctaButton { background-color: #34495E!important; } .u2b67f0da6207e7ceced9a967f94de5dc .centered-text { display: table; height: 80px; padding-left : 18px; top: 0; } .u2b67f0da6207e7ceced9a967f94de5dc .u2b67f0da6207e7ceced9a967f94de5dc-content { display: table-cell; margin: 0; padding: 0; padding-right: 108px; position: relative; vertical-align: middle; width: 100%; } .u2b67f0da6207e7ceced9a967f94de5dc:after { content: ""; display: block; clear: both; } READ: Expressive arts EssayUltimately, in the end, this leads to Frankensteins demise even though he realizes that it might, for the death of either his creation or himself will obliterate and relieve all the sufferings that he has been forced to endure. Frankenstien is the tale of a man doomed to failure and death for his desire to play with nature. By creating a destructive being, in human form, that he cannot control, Victor Frankenstein brings about his own ruin. Frankenstein neglects to take responsibility for his creation, abandoning him, resulting in the murder of his most loved ones as the creations revenge. In his idealism, Frankenstein is blinded and is unable to fores ee the drastic effects of giving life to a being that could never be entirely accepted by human society, that further the creations vindictiveness. Lastly, consciously choosing to pursue his creation in vengeance, Frankensteins sufferings are finally obliterated, for he was well aware that it may lead to his ultimate doom. The creation of an unloved being and the search for a death cure hold Victor Frankenstien more responsible for his own demise than the creation himself.

Friday, April 10, 2020

World civilizations 1500 Essay Example For Students

World civilizations 1500 Essay March 17, 19991. Essay form (7%)2. Tenochtitlan case study (10%)3. Mozambique case study (13%)4. Comparison of Tenochtitlan and Mozambique cases (15%)5. Summary of the gun powder arguments in Stearns (35%)6. Discussion and critique of gun powder arguments in the light of the Tenochtitlan and Mozambique case studies (20%)In the past wars were fought to gain land, wealth, and fame. Two such examples of this are the battle of Tenochtitlan and Mozambique. These are two battles that disprove the gun powder superiority theory. Certain countries look to get an advantage, by incorporating such things as guns, canons, and steel armor. Some countries look to gain an advantage through superior numbers. Several Army leaders simply believed they were superior to their adversaries. Such as the case in Tenochtitlan. We will write a custom essay on World civilizations 1500 specifically for you for only $16.38 $13.9/page Order now The purpose for the invasion of Mexico is not clear however, has stated above it is usually for power, land, or money. In this case Cortes was looking for gold that he hoped he could take from a primitive people. In April 1521Cortes had reached Tenochtitlan. This would mark the beginning of the battle between the Spanish and the Aztec. Before the Spanish arrived in Mexico, a sickness broke out. This epidemic was small pox. Small pox decimated villages. Small pox caused blemishes on people faces, it caused their bodies to become stiff, and made some people unable to move. And when things were in this state, the Spaniards came (Sources, 70 L.). Twelve Spanish boats had come, traveling the coast and looking for places to land. The Spanish managed to get two boats in. It is documented that these boats came in fighting. There were deaths on both sides, and on both sides captives were taken. (Sources, 70 L.). It is recorded that at the first sight of the Spaniards the natives ran. With the village emptied the Spaniards took as they pleased. As the Spaniards continued they came to a place where the fortress was well fortified. This presented no obstacle as they used their canons to blast down the wall.and the fourth time finally the wall went to the ground once and for all (sources, 70 L.) Once inside, the Tzilacatzin and some other warriors went out to face the oncoming Spaniards. These warriors used nothing more than stones repeal the oncoming Spanish. This sent the Spaniards retreating. Some of these warriors hid in the dense brush, and as the Spaniards came through the warriors ambush them. The Spaniards had come with gunpowder and guns and when ambushed these guns did not help. The selection is not specific but I dont believe the Aztec had guns of any kind. Then he went and threw a Spaniard down, knocking him to the ground (Sources 71 L.). The captives were taken to Yacacolca and sacrificed. Spanish first and all other second. The heads were hung on skull racks f acing the East. The Aztec won this battle but it would be short-lived. The second example is the battle in Mozambique. This is similar to the previously described battle in that the natives seemed fearful at first, and retaliated to win the battle. The Portuguese arrived in the rivers of Cuama in the year 1593. Dom Pedro de Sousa led them. This battle was a retaliation of an earlier battle in which the Zimba had killed one of the Portuguese priests. Dom Pedro de Sousa obtained information about his enemy and quickly raised an army. 200 Portuguese and 1500 Kaffirs (sources, 65 L.) He also took various pieces of artillery, which he wanted to use on the walls. When this failed he was determined to enter by assault. He had part of the trench filled, through which several of his soldiers were wounded by the arrows being shot from above. The natives also used boiling fat and water, which they poured on the attackers and scalded them. They also used iron hooks, which they would stick through the holes of the wall and grab anyone who came too close and wounded them mortally. Following this encounter the captain ordered his men back to camp so they could rest and tend to the wounded. The captain had an idea that would put his men on an equal ground with the natives. He would build wickerwork frames that his men could stand on in use their guns against the Zimba. With this strategy nearly ready to go, several of his men claimed to have received letters from their wives relating a danger at home. The residents of Sena went to the captain and begged him to abandon the siege of the Zimba and attend to what was of greater importance (Sources 65r). The captain believing these letters to be true abandoned the siege. At nightfall the Zimba fell upon the camp and killed some men who were still there. As in the example above the natives were victorious. .uab020b5b4be9a3705c0bc1a892156e05 , .uab020b5b4be9a3705c0bc1a892156e05 .postImageUrl , .uab020b5b4be9a3705c0bc1a892156e05 .centered-text-area { min-height: 80px; position: relative; } .uab020b5b4be9a3705c0bc1a892156e05 , .uab020b5b4be9a3705c0bc1a892156e05:hover , .uab020b5b4be9a3705c0bc1a892156e05:visited , .uab020b5b4be9a3705c0bc1a892156e05:active { border:0!important; } .uab020b5b4be9a3705c0bc1a892156e05 .clearfix:after { content: ""; display: table; clear: both; } .uab020b5b4be9a3705c0bc1a892156e05 { display: block; transition: background-color 250ms; webkit-transition: background-color 250ms; width: 100%; opacity: 1; transition: opacity 250ms; webkit-transition: opacity 250ms; background-color: #95A5A6; } .uab020b5b4be9a3705c0bc1a892156e05:active , .uab020b5b4be9a3705c0bc1a892156e05:hover { opacity: 1; transition: opacity 250ms; webkit-transition: opacity 250ms; background-color: #2C3E50; } .uab020b5b4be9a3705c0bc1a892156e05 .centered-text-area { width: 100%; position: relative ; } .uab020b5b4be9a3705c0bc1a892156e05 .ctaText { border-bottom: 0 solid #fff; color: #2980B9; font-size: 16px; font-weight: bold; margin: 0; padding: 0; text-decoration: underline; } .uab020b5b4be9a3705c0bc1a892156e05 .postTitle { color: #FFFFFF; font-size: 16px; font-weight: 600; margin: 0; padding: 0; width: 100%; } .uab020b5b4be9a3705c0bc1a892156e05 .ctaButton { background-color: #7F8C8D!important; color: #2980B9; border: none; border-radius: 3px; box-shadow: none; font-size: 14px; font-weight: bold; line-height: 26px; moz-border-radius: 3px; text-align: center; text-decoration: none; text-shadow: none; width: 80px; min-height: 80px; background: url(https://artscolumbia.org/wp-content/plugins/intelly-related-posts/assets/images/simple-arrow.png)no-repeat; position: absolute; right: 0; top: 0; } .uab020b5b4be9a3705c0bc1a892156e05:hover .ctaButton { background-color: #34495E!important; } .uab020b5b4be9a3705c0bc1a892156e05 .centered-text { display: table; height: 80px; padding-left : 18px; top: 0; } .uab020b5b4be9a3705c0bc1a892156e05 .uab020b5b4be9a3705c0bc1a892156e05-content { display: table-cell; margin: 0; padding: 0; padding-right: 108px; position: relative; vertical-align: middle; width: 100%; } .uab020b5b4be9a3705c0bc1a892156e05:after { content: ""; display: block; clear: both; } READ: Alexander The Great EssayThere were some similarities in these two battles. The obvious similarity is that the natives won in both cases. The next similarity is that the winner did not need the use of guns nor canons. It seems the gunpowder was not a deciding factor in the outcome of either of these battles. In both battles the deciding factor was the strategy used by both sides leaders. In the Tenochtitlan battle the natives lay hidden in the brush and waited to ambush the oncoming Spaniards, and were able to win without the use of gunpowder. In the battle Mozambique the natives remained in their fortress and with out the use of gunpowder held back the mighty Portuguese. The greatest difference between these two battles is that in the battle of Mozambique the Portuguese must have grown tired or maybe fearful of fighting the natives. This is evident because of the alleged letters they received from their wives. In the battle of Tenochtitlan the men may have been ambushed so quickly they did not have time to develop fear of the natives and their weapons. These two battles present interesting situations in which the technologically advanced peoples lost to a more primitive culture. Stearns adequately discusses how countries became world powers through the use an adaptation of gunpowder. In fact, it goes so far as to say that the only reason nations using gunpowder fell, is because of weak central governments. The Chinese had great success with gunpowder and other countries seeing this success wanted to duplicate it. Thus, they hired specialists to replicate and in some cases improve upon the existing guns. In many areas, the new military technology contributed decisively to broader social and political transformations. (Stearns, 119r). In these cases canons were used to reduce enemy castles to nothing more than scrap rock. This brought about a major change in defense systems. The resulting systems were often expensive, but resulted in a core of new highway strategic officers. As stated earlier some countries fell because of weak centr al governments. In an effort to avoid this the Japanese banned firearms. They felt the public having firearms would promote revolts. In the end it is shown that countries that adapted to using guns were more successful and maintained power longer. In each of the Muslim Empires, decline was both relative to and hastened by the rise of European rivals, who proved more adept at taking advantage of the power potential offered by the gun powder revolution. (Stearns, 120r). So the question remains why did two primitive countries defeat major nations in two separate battles? Our book would have us believe that any nation holding gunpowder technology would be superior to a country that does not possess that technology. These two battles clearly show that more goes into a flight than just technology. In the battle of Tenochtitlan the egotistical Spanish marched right into their own death trap. In the battle Mozambique several factors played: 1. Poor leadership 2. Poor strategy. The captain let his men gets so down after their first defeat that they did not want to go back again. Also, it was very poor strategy to attack a fortress where the soldiers were looking down on you. The captain had a better strategy but by then it was too late his men were fearful fighting again. These two battles go to show that our authors have over estimated gunpowder. It is a tool, but not the deciding factor.

Monday, March 9, 2020

The House of the Spirits Essay Example

The House of the Spirits Essay Example The House of the Spirits Essay The House of the Spirits Essay Illegitimacy has always been stigmatized in society, particularly throughout the nineteenth century. This is reflected in literature by characters who are portrayed using stereotypical features of illegitimacy like avidity, intensity or vehemence. The prejudice was that children who are conceived in lust and irresponsibility will result in more sensual and fiery personalities. I will base my study of illegitimate children in literature on the characters of Therese Raquin in Therese Raquin and Esteban Garcia in The House of the Spirits.To study the way in which the two authors portray illegitimacy, Esteban Garcia who is Esteban Truebas illegitimate grandson and Therese Raquin, who is also an illegitimate child, will be compared. Even though it can be argued that these two characters lived in completely different times and have personalities that differ greatly, their illegitimacy and the prejudice that surrounds it brings them together. Because of the stereotype that comes with children who are born outside of marriage, authors sometimes write characters who are particularly passionate, unstable emotionally or impulsive as illegitimate.Both Esteban and Therese have very intense personalities and they are particularly impulsive. In Estebans case, this is shown through violence and physical as well as psychological torture. For Therese, her true nature is shown through her strong sexual desires and extremely passionate lovemaking. In The House of the Spirits, Esteban Garcia is shown to have a sickening morbidity to him from a very early age. He leads Esteban Trueba to Pedro Tercero and after his grandfather has injured Pedros hand, Esteban Garcia: had picked up the sliced-off fingers and was holding them like a bouquet of bloody asparagusI vomited all over my boots while the boy smiled impassively.(p.240)The novelist shows us here how perverted the child is as a scene which makes the stoic Esteban Trueba sick, only gets a smile out of Esteban Garcia. In Therese Raquin however, even though Therese had always been an inflamed child and adolescent, she hid it from the people around her and acted as a rather apathetic person. It is once she meets Laurent and they become lovers that her true personality that had been dormant inside her is revealed: It was as though her face had been lit up from within and fire leaped from her flesh. Her boiling blood and taut nerves radiated warmth, something keen and penetrating. (p.63)This shows that even though Therese attempts to conceal her true self, it still comes out eventually. This is an example of determinism, no matter how much effort she puts into hiding her lustful personality, it will still be revealed as it is a part of her. Following the prejudice, children born outside of marriage werent considered to have full membership of society, also their social status cannot have been as important as legitimate children.As it was considered that illegitimate children were closer to animals than proper human beings, they were expected to be more prone to mental ilnesses or being emotionally unstable. Perhaps this was because being seen as an outsider brought on frustration and resent towards society. In The House of the Spirits, Esteban Garcia clearly demonstrates resent as he speaks of Alba as She embodied everything he would never have(p.328) :He, barefoot in the mud, swore that one day he would make her pay for her arrogance and avenge himself for his cursed bastard fate. (p.469) Esteban Garcia kept to his promise and later on tortured and sexually abused Alba for weeks. In Therese Raquin, this kind of lower status is also seen. The novelist sometimes describes Therese as he would a domestic animal. She sounds like a type of apathetic pet who lacks a soul and personality: She had always shown such passive obedience that her aunt and husband no longer bothered to ask her opinion. She went where they went, did what they did, without a word of complaint or reproach, without even appearing to notice that she was moving at all. (p.43)It is as though the Raquin family had adopted a wild beast and tamed it into a pet. Zola does however, reveal Thereses true impulsive nature by sudden outbursts. He emphasises these using a lot of animal imagery. This is again an example of determinism. At unexpected times, Therese uncontrollably lets her instinctual side show: One day he (Camille) gave her a push and knocked her over : she leaped to her feet like a wild beast and with face aflame and bloodshot eyes flew at him with both arms raised. (p.41)Events like these reinforce the portrayal of Therese as a wild spirit trapped inside a passive womans body. Comparably, in The House of the Spirits, Esteban Garcia is sometimes described using animal imagery and seen by other characters to have beast like features. Particularly Alba, who was inflicted by most of his violence and torture. After Esteban forcefully kissed her on her fourteenth birthday Alba is traumatized and even has nightmares: She told no one of that repulsive kiss or of the dreams that she had afterward, in which Garcia appeared as a green beast that tried to strangle her with his paws and asphyxiate her by shoving a slimy tentacle down her throat. (p.374)The way Alba sees Esteban Garcia only emphasises Allendes character as being particularly violent, repulsive and brutal. Therese and Estebans sexual attitude also reveals their instinctive, almost subhuman selves. They both have an enormous apetite for sex and prove to be near savage in practice. In The House of the Spirits, Esteban comes across as sadistic when he fantasises about Alba as she is sitting on his lap:

Saturday, February 22, 2020

Public Evaluation Essay Example | Topics and Well Written Essays - 6500 words

Public Evaluation - Essay Example The evaluation process offers an overview of the possibilities through which policy makers are able to make precise and clear judgments on a particular policy implemented. Varied models attempts to explain the way evaluation process in policy can lead to successful policy making. This essay explains the significant methodologies employed in the evaluation process. It also focuses on varied approaches that were put a cross in an attempt of revealing the implication of evaluation and the way it can help policy makers to address policy issues. Evaluators employ collaborative relationships in order to collect adequate data that actors will analyze in order to determine in case a certain policy is effective or ineffective. Therefore, they employ varied methodologies in order to deal with contingencies that might modify the formal way of policy evaluation (Alkin 2010, p. 58). For the policy makers to understand a policy problem, they have to evaluate it through collecting data or informati on and analyze the collected data in a manner that enables them to find the desired solution to the problem. For instance, the stakeholders involved in the evaluation process let say an environmental policy, may gather adequate information through use of quantitative method in order to arrive at the desired goals. The policy analysts can chose the quantitative design model for analyzing the policy such as non-parametric or parametric experimental methods. The quantitative methodologies can include observations, interviews, questionnaires and surveys. Alternatively, the can chose qualitative design as a model for policy analysis such as observation, focused groups, interviews, surveys and case study analysis. These methodologies are significant because they can enable stakeholders to gather unbiased and precise information of a certain policy; thus making modifications or changes where necessary (Vedung, 1997, p.229). Radin (2006, p. 547) argues that performance measures as indicator s for public policy complexity. Therefore, he employs some approaches especially classical approach to reveal the measures of policy performance. Although, the author narrows this approach without the organization context in which the policy operates; thus reliability and neutrality of data requires evaluation. However, Radin does not defend classical approach because it logic, insensitive to the proper role of professional knowledge. The outcomes are also an enormous amount of misplace tasks, which can actually paralyze government rather than improving it (Radin (2006, p. 549). Performance measurement has become one of the significant indicators and a mechanism for data management. Radin uses numerous case studies especially that of government performance and results act and program assessment rating tool as effective approach toward policy performance measurement ((Radin (2006, p. 548). The case studies are appealing and it mostly tackles on the way performance measurement is empl oyed as an indicator for policy performance determination. However, the performance measure approach has some drawbacks, thus other models such as goal-attainment model attempts to reveal the way a policy can become successful. Vedung (1997, p.555) reveals the way stakeholder involved in